Spring 2021 Final Exam Exemption List

Please see the list below for students who are exempt from the final exam! Excellent work! ūüôā

First Period:

  • Komari B.
  • Tejuan B.
  • Dennis C.
  • Austin C.
  • Laila D.
  • Yokaius E.
  • Trahaun G.
  • Brian H.
  • Safie L.
  • Kevin M.
  • Ocean M.
  • Bryan M.
  • Monaye O.
  • Timothy Y.

Fourth Period:

  • Isac A.
  • Rene C.
  • Areah C.
  • Nikole C.
  • Uwhomano E.
  • Faith F.
  • Jessica M.
  • Nate N.
  • Michelle O.
  • Hanny R.
  • Saul R.
  • Amaiya S.
  • Frandy S.
  • Lauren T.
  • Jaiden W.
  • Blake W.

LAST FULL WEEK!

Welcome to our last full week of class together! We will we wrapping up all of our semester’s work this week. If you are exempting your final, this Friday will be your last day with Ms. A. and Ms. Lowe!

Please see below for a brief schedule of this week:

Monday: One-Word Acrostic


Tuesday: FINAL Amnesty Day

All assignments will be closed at 11:59 pm on Wednesday, May 19.


Thursday: Final Exam Study Guide


Friday: Final Exam Study Guide and Written Portion of Final Exam

We’re Almost Done! Semester Final Stretch

We have two full weeks before the end of the semester! This week, we will wrap up our semester’s work and start preparing for final exams on the week of the 24th. The grades this week and next are your last few going in before the final exam, so be sure to finish strong!

Please be sure you are on time and present each day! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together: 

Monday, May 101. Warm-up: M.U.G. Monday
2. What do we already know about the Harlem Renaissance?
3. Historical context of “Sweat”
4. Assignment: Academic English and African-American Vernacular English (AE and AAVE)
This assignment can be found in “Lesson Assignments” or on my blog below.
5. Reading:¬†“Sweat,” by Zora Neale Hurston
– Please scroll past the calendar for a link to the reading.
Tuesday, May 111. Warm-up: Lit. Term Tuesday (denotation and connotation; review Biblical allusions)
2. Reading:¬†“Sweat,” by Zora Neale Hurston
– Please scroll past the calendar for a link to the reading.
Wednesday, May 12Reminder: Asynchronous Learning Day (No Live Classes)
– Please use today to get caught up on any missing assignments!
Thursday, May 131. Warm-up: Test Prep Thursday
2. Reading:¬†“Sweat,” by Zora Neale Hurston
– Please scroll past the calendar for a link to the reading.
Friday, May 141. Warm-up:¬†Free Write Friday
2. Determining and tracing the development of theme
3. Assignment:¬†“Sweat” text-dependent questions and constructed response via CommonLit
Please visit CommonLit.org to complete this assignment.

Welcome to Amnesty Week!

noun: amnesty; plural noun: amnesties

  1. an undertaking by the authorities to take no action against specified offenses or offenders during a fixed period.
    • Synonyms: pardon, reprieve, mercy

This week is amnesty week. There are no new assignments this week — no warm-up log, no USATP, nothing new.

Instead, your focus for this week will be to get your overall class grade what YOU want it to be. You earn grades; Ms. Lowe and I do not give them.

If your grade is…Then shoot for…
85+At least a 94% to maintain an overall “A” and exempt the final exam
75-84At least an 84% to maintain an overall “B” and exempt the final exam
68-75At least a 74% to maintain passing and not have to do course extension
67 and belowAt least a 60% to get to course extension

**Use “Ctrl+F” (Windows) or “Command+F” (Mac) to search for your CCSD ID.


Please see the Priority Ladder below. You should be working through each step in order.

  1. Summative Assessments (Unit 1 Post Test and Unit 2 Post Test)
  2. Persuasive Speech (it is out of 120 points!)
  3. USA Test Prep Assignments
  4. Any other missing assignments throughout the semester — prioritize larger-point assignments
  5. Extra credit assignment: This week is Teacher Appreciation Week! Use Canva or Adobe Spark to create an e-card for your favorite teacher! Your letter must be at least one paragraph long and specific to the teacher and his or her class.

Note: Thank you to those of you who completed the EPL assignment. I haven’t forgotten to grade them — those who turned them in already will receive extra credit. No late assignments for that assignment will be accepted.

Prioritize your core classes. For some of you, you will have to decide which class(es) you need to pass in order not to get retained. If you’re sitting at all 40s or 50s, realistically, you may have to take an “L” in one class to prioritize the others.

Lit. Term Tuesday: April 20, 2021

Good morning to our first period and good afternoon to our fourth period!

As you know, Ms. A. will be out today, but you still have Ms. Lowe! Please make sure to take advantage of class time and Ms. Lowe’s help to complete your rough drafts today.

Today’s Lit. Term Tuesday was supposed to be a review of transitions. However, since this is not new, please take a few minutes before jumping into writing to review one or more of the websites below (just click on each “button” to visit the website). As you write your rough draft, ensure you are utilizing transitions within and between paragraphs to connect your thoughts and arguments!

And a solid list here from Ginger Software:

BE GOOD!

See you Wednesday,

Ms. A.

Week 14: Wrap up Persuasive Speeches

This week, we will complete our persuasive speeches and wrap up unit 2. There is PLENTY of information on this post regarding the persuasive speech, so please be sure to refer back to this post often. Please be sure you are on time and present each day! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together: 

Monday, April 191. Warm-up: M.U.G. Monday 
2. Transferring outlines to drafts
3. MLA Formatting
Please view the information and template on my blog below!
4. Start working on rough drafts
Tuesday, April 201. Warm-up: Lit Term Tuesday
2. Complete rough drafts in class
Wednesday, April 21Reminder: Regular School Day Today!
1. Warm-up: Words on Wednesday: “Said is Dead”
-Please view the “Said is Dead” list on my blog below!
2. Work session: revisions and final drafts
Thursday, April 221. Warm-up: Test Prep Thursday
2. How to create a Works Cited in MLA format mini-lesson
3. Work session: complete final drafts
Friday, April 23Reminder: Asynchronous Learning Day! 

1. Please use today’s time to complete your final drafts if you did not do so during class time. Please submit your completed persuasive speech by midnight on Sunday via CTLS.
2. You must also record yourself presenting your speech on the Padlet here!
3. Don’t forget that USATP is due by 11:59 pm on Sunday!

Transferring Outlines to Drafts

Once you’re done with your outline, move on to your rough draft. Since you outlined and organized your ideas in the outlining stage of the writing process, all you have to do is put it all together! Basically, you are taking your organized bullet points and turning them into complete sentences and paragraphs. Make sure you are always considering audience and purpose, as this will dictate your choices in rhetorical appeals and strategies used.

Please use this template to type your speech (File > Make a Copy).

Once you make a copy, please re-title your document to your first and last name.


Said is Dead!

Please use the list below for your Words on Wednesday Warm-up!


Works Cited

Please read the instructions below thoroughly to ensure you know how to complete a Works Cited!

Are ALL of your appeals to logic and credibility (ethos and logos) cited in your paper with quotation marks and parenthetical citations? If not, this is priority #1! CITE YOUR SOURCES! Sources and information that is not properly cited is considered PLAGIARISM and will earn you a big fat zero. Plus, Ms. A. will show you NO chill.

Now that you’ve finished up your rough drafts and included parenthetical citations for ALL of your sources, it’s time to move on to the Works Cited page. Your Works Cited will list all of the sources you have included in your essay.

Please click here for step-by-step instructions on how to create a Works Cited page!

(Please note that you will have to download the video to your computer to watch it. It is quite long, so it may take a minute to load.)

Or, follow the written steps below to create a Works Cited page, which will be the last page of your essay.

  1. When you’re at the end of your essay, hit “enter/return” until you hit a fresh, new page. At the top of that new page, center-align the title, “Works Cited.” Be sure to capitalize the “W” and the “C”!
  2. Hit “enter/return” one more time and left-align your cursor. (Your cursor is the blinking line that shows up as you type.)
  3. Open up all three (or more) of your sources in separate tabs in a browser. (It’s 2021, quit using Internet Explorer.)
  4. In another tab, open up www.easybib.com. EasyBib is an excellent citation generator you should use for ALL of your essays!
  5. Copy and paste the URL of your first source into EasyBib. Make sure you’re using the “Website” tab.
  6. Click “Cite it.”
  7. On the next page, you may have one or more options of citations to use. Choose the article name that fits yours, and click “Cite this.”
  8. Click “Continue to the final step.”
  9. Now here’s where it can get a little tricky. You’ll have to use your detective skills here, because websites are all formatted differently. First, make sure every word, other than words like “the,” “a,” “an,” “and,” “be,” etc. are capitalized. For example, “Why teachers’ salaries should be doubled – now” needs to be edited as, “Why Teachers’ Salaries Should be Doubled – Now”
  10. Under “Contributors,” include the first and last names of ALL authors listed on the website. The author’s name (or byline, as it’s called in journalism) is typically immediately below the headline, or title of the article.
  11. Include the website title. Again, be sure all major words are capitalized (for example, The Washington Post).
  12. You can leave the publisher/sponsor blank, if it’s not already filled in.
  13. Include the FULL URL.
  14. “Electronically published” is the date that the article was published online. You can typically find this in the byline by the author’s name. If there is no date, use the copyright year, which is typically found at the very, very bottom of the website.
  15. Click “Create Citation.” Hooray! Your first citation is done!
  16. Follow steps 5-15 above for each source. Make sure you’re using the same window on EasyBib, as it will automatically save all of your citations in one place, which is what you want!
  17. Once all of your sources are in one place, copy and paste the entire Works Cited into the page you titled “Works Cited.” Make sure your sources are all in alphabetical order by the first word in the source.
  18. Next, you will have to create a hanging indent. In Google Docs, make sure you have the ruler view on. If you see numbers at the top, the ruler is on. If you don’t, go to “View” > “Show ruler.”
  19. Highlight your ENTIRE Works Cited, with the exception of the words “Works Cited.”
  20. In the ruler, you will see a rectangle and a triangle. Move both over to the right to 0.5.
  21. Selecting ONLY the top rectangle, move the rectangle to the left, back to 0.0. Click here to see it in action!
  22. You’re all done! ūüôā

BEFORE YOU SUBMIT YOUR FINAL DRAFT…

Make sure you have reviewed the rubric provided in class a couple of weeks ago. Refer to each category to ensure you have all requirements.

Week 13: Back to the Persuasive Speech!

I hope you had a great Spring Break! This week, we will continue working on our persuasive speeches and take our unit 2 assessment. Please be sure you are on time and present each day! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together: 

Monday, April 12
  1. Warm-up: M.U.G. Monday 
  2. Introductions and Conclusions
    • Please view the information on my blog below!
  3. Complete introduction and conclusion
Tuesday, April 13
  1. Warm-up: Lit Term Tuesday (diction and syntax; review rhetorical appeals)
  2. Assessment: Unit 2 post-assessment via CTLS Assess
Wednesday, April 14Reminder: Regular School Day Today!
  1. Warm-up: Words on Wednesday: Counterclaim
  2. Counterclaims mini-lesson
  3. Complete counterclaim; complete outline of persuasive speech
Thursday, April 15
  1. Warm-up: Test Prep Thursday
  2. How to embed quotations in MLA format mini-lesson
  3. Work session: complete entire outline
Friday, April 16

Reminder: Asynchronous Learning Day! 

  • Please use today’s time to complete your outline (intro, conclusion, and three body paragraphs) if you did not do so during class time. Don’t forget that USATP is due by 11:59 pm on Sunday!

 

research

Introductions

The introduction to a research paper can be the most challenging part of the paper to write. The length of the introduction will vary depending on the type of research paper you are writing. An introduction should announce your topic, provide context and a rationale for your work, before stating your research questions and hypothesis. Well-written introductions set the tone for the paper, catch the reader’s interest, and communicate the thesis statement.

  1. Announce your research topic. You can start your introduction with a few sentences which announce the topic of your paper and give an indication of the kind of research questions you will be asking. This is a good way to introduce your readers to your topic and pique their interest. The first few sentences should act as an indication of a broader problem which you will then focus in on more closely in the rest of your introduction, leading to your specific research questions.
  2. Define any key terms or concepts. It may be necessary for you to clarify any key terms or concepts early on in your introduction. You need to express yourself clearly throughout your paper so if you leave an unfamiliar term or concept unexplained, you risk your readers not having a clear understanding of your argument.

(From WikiHow)

Some suggestions on how to start your speech…

  • Pose a rhetorical question
  • Use imagery to pull your reader in (set the scene; opportunity for pathos!)
  • Start with a surprising or unusual fact/statistic
  • Provide a relevant anecdote
  • Reveal a common misconception
  • More examples here!

Be sure to consider your audience and purpose when writing the introduction!


Conclusions

Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research. The following outline may help you conclude your paper:

In a general way,

  • Restate your topic and why it is important,
  • Restate your thesis/claim,
  • Address opposing viewpoints and explain why readers should align with your position,
  • Call for action or overview future research possibilities.

Remember that once you accomplish these tasks, unless otherwise directed by your instructor, you are finished. Done. Complete. Don’t try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang (!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message.

The preacher’s maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers:

  1. Tell what you’re going to tell them (introduction).
  2. Tell them (body).
  3. Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

(From Purdue OWL)

Week 12: Wrap up The Crucible

This week, we take a little break from our persuasive speech and continue our reading of Arthur Miller’s play, The CruciblePlease be sure you are on time and present each day — we only have one more week until break! You can do it! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together: 

Monday, March 291. Warm-up: M.U.G. Monday
2. Review Character Map
The character map can be found in “Lesson Resources” or on my blog below.
3. Continue reading The Crucible
4. Ongoing Assignment: Act 1 text-dependent questions
The reading and assignment can be found in “Lesson Assignments” or on my blog below.
Tuesday, March 301. Continue reading¬†The Crucible
2. Ongoing Assignment: Act 1 text-dependent questions
The reading and assignment can be found in “Lesson Assignments” or on my blog below.
Wednesday, March 31REMINDER: For this week only, we are back to Wednesday as our weekly asynchronous learning day!
Please use this day to get caught up on any missing work. I am missing quite a few EPL advertisement projects in particular.
Ms. Antonacci will be available via Remind, Email, or Zoom.
Thursday, April 11. Complete reading and text-dependent questions for Act 1
2. Start watching The Crucible
Friday, April 21. Complete watching The Crucible
USATP due by 11:59 pm on Sunday! 
Assignment: Spring Break Assignment The assignment can be found on my blog below (NOT in CTLS).

Week 11: The Crucible

Due to our change in schedule last week, this week, we will start our reading of Arthur Miller’s play, The Crucible! Please be sure you are on time and present each day! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together: 

Monday, March 221. Warm-up: MUG Monday
2. Start reading The Crucible
3. Ongoing Assignment: Act 1 text-dependent questions
The reading and assignment can be found in “Lesson Resources” or on my blog below.
Tuesday, March 231. Warm-up: Lit. Term Tuesday
2. Continue reading The Crucible
3. Ongoing Assignment: Act 1 text-dependent questions
The reading and assignment can be found in “Lesson Resources” or on my blog below.
Wednesday, March 24Reminder: This Wednesday is a regular school day!
1. Warm-up: Words on Wednesday
2. Continue reading The Crucible
3. Ongoing Assignment: Act 1 text-dependent questions
The reading and assignment can be found in “Lesson Resources” or on my blog below.
Thursday, March 251. Warm-up: Test Prep Thursday
Scroll down to download the Persuasive Speech Rubric!
2. Persuasive Speech Writing Work Session (complete outline for body paragraphs)
Friday, March 26Asynchronous Learning Day — No Live Classes Today!
Please use this day to complete your speech outline (three body paragraphs) if you did not do so in class on Thursday.
**Don’t forget USA Test Prep (due Sunday)!

Week 10: The Persuasive Speech and The Crucible

This week, we will start the week with our persuasive speech and start our reading of Arthur Miller’s play, The Crucible on Friday. Please be sure you are on time and present each day! Please see below for a brief schedule of our week together:

Monday, March 141. Warm-up: M.U.G. Monday
2. Assessment: Unit 2 mid-assessment via CommonLit
Please take your “Sinners in the Hands” assessment via CommonLit.org.
3. Assignment: The Crucible Anticipation Guide
The assignment can be found in “Lesson Assignments” or on my blog below.
Tuesday, March 151. Warm-up: Lit. Term Tuesday
2. Choosing supporting evidence for your persuasive speech
3. Providing commentary
4. Brief overview of outline format (download the template below!)
Wednesday, March 16Change in Schedule — regular classes today!
1. Warm-up: Words on Wednesday (transitional words and phrases)
Download the transitional words and phrases document below.
2. Outlining your persuasive speech
Thursday, March 171. Warm-up: Test Prep Thursday
2. Mini-debate on Anticipation Guide
3. Start reading The Crucible
Friday, March 18Change in Schedule — this Friday will be an asynchronous learning day (no live classes). 
Ms. Antonacci will be holding Unit 1 Assessment make-ups on this day. 
Please use this day to get caught up on any missing work!